Category: Investigations

DOJ Refines Monitorship Policies

Ultimately, a monitor should benefit the company, its employees, shareholders, and the public by effectively furthering the goal of preventing and detecting future misconduct.

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Third Party Red Flags

Knowing who you conduct business within your supply chain is a very good if not leading business practice. Many organizations are being held responsible for the actions of their business

Perfect Place Syndrome and the 10-80-10 Rule to Ethics

At some point it appears there was a human behavior theory that was possibly applied to fraud risk management and the 10-80-10 Rule to Ethics was born.

This theory is based on the assumption that 10 percent of the people are ethical all of the time, 80 percent could behave unethically depending on the situation or the pressure(s) being applied, and 10 percent have no or a severely broken moral compass and will pounce on opportunities to commit fraud.

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Fraud Tip Friday: Concealment

The act” of fraud typically involves not only the execution of the scheme itself, but also efforts by the fraudster to deliberately suppress or conceal their bad behavior and then

Compliance 101 – Internal Controls Defined

Compliance officers talk about controls constantly. Effective controls are the lifeblood of what makes a compliance program work. Most of us can rattle off examples of controls, or recognize a control when we see one.
So my fellow speaker asked the audience: What is a control?

Nobody dared answer. We all, me included, were suddenly uncertain that we could define a control correctly.

The speaker who posed this question is Jonathan T. Marks, partner at Baker Tilly and a prolific thinker on all things forensics, audit, and internal control. Lately Marks has been asking audit and compliance audiences to define a control — and to his dismay, most people can’t.

Read Marks’ definition of internal control.

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(Advanced) Meta-model of Fraud – Two triangles combine for better fraud case comprehension

The Fraud Triangle is tried and true, but we might need more to understand our cases. The authors describe a “meta-model of fraud” that combines the “why-based” Fraud Triangle with the “what-based” Triangle of Fraud Action to better explain fraud cases. We might never know exactly why fraudsters commit crimes, but we can always gather facts and evidence to help prevent and deter fraud.

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